Welcome to our Blog!

Everything about Mobile Advertising!

Ever-present mobile boosts brands

We’ve looked at quite a bit of mobile marketing theory over the past several weeks. Perhaps today, as we close off another mobile month, is a good time to rewind somewhat and to revisit the entral premise – and promise! – of mobile marketing. As the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) succinctly puts it: “Mobile is the closest you can get to your customers”. The simple reason this is so is because every moment is mobile in the world today. The cellular phone is so central to our daily lives that the MMA states that “consumers check their mobile device 150 to 200 times per day”. Imagine switching on the television 200 times a day or opening the post box even just 20 times a day – that’d be serious OCD behaviour! Mobile consumers aren’t obsessive compulsive, they’re just interacting in a sensible way with a device that we depend on for socialising, transacting and more. Mobile isn’t just a boon for consumers because it enables them to conduct their daily lives more efficiently, it boosts brands. The MMA’s research indicates that 61% of people have a better opinion of brands when they offer a good mobile experience. Through mobile, brands have the ability to be present at the exact moment a consumer is seeking a solution. Nothing could be more basic – and powerful – than brands being where the consumers...

What really underpins mobile campaigns?

We’ve looked at the mobile marketing value chain and mobile marketing drivers, amongst other key concepts, during this series of blog posts. What I now plan to do is to change gear a little and go back to basics. With this in mind, what really underpins mobile marketing theory, and what could be seen as the foundation pillars of the art? From InTarget’s substantial experience over the past decade or so, we’ve identified four non-negotiable pillars that should always serve as the foundation of the mobile marketing vision. Simply put, no successful mobile marketing campaign exists without these. Firstly, consumer preference is a sovereign right and mobile users should be able to engage and disengage from campaigns at will. Secondly, great marketing should be viewed as a service as mobile marketing can provide valuable discounts to consumers, for example text messages alerting customers to special offers. Thirdly, personalisation is critical to achieve consistent results and requires specific profiling of the message which in turn leads to increased customer transactions. Finally, as in all commercial areas, relationships drive transactions. In contrast to marketing via other media, mobile campaigns may not generate immediate transaction spikes. Rather, developing engaging relationships with customers leads to a greater number of transactions over...

The five key elements of mobile marketing

Just as there are the four key elements of the traditional marketing mix, namely product, price, promotion and place, there are similarly five key areas within the mobile marketing mix. They are content, cross-media marketing, campaign management, customer database and carrier cooperation. Successful mobile marketing campaigns run by specialist firms such as InTarget will include all of these key elements. Let’s take a brief look at each of them in turn. Content is a key factor in creating a mobile service that attracts the users and keeps them engaged. The maxim ‘content is king’ is equally relevant in mobile marketing. This is a particularly- challenging one, however, because the personal nature of the mobile phone makes appealing content selection especially tricky. Cross-media marketing refers to the idea that mobile marketing is not a lonely island in a sea of different media. Mobile media needs traditional media in order to thrive and to push home the point of sale call to action that is the goal of most mobile campaigns. Campaign management refers to the fact that mobile marketing technology that enables campaign execution and analysing is one of the major success factors and is a crucial element of the marketing mix. Customer database refers to mobile marketing being mandated by law to be permission-based. This simply means InTarget will always adopt an opt-in approach. Finally, carrier cooperation means that the network operators have expertise and knowledge of mobile service delivery. They control the distribution channel and location-based services by allowing for message delivery and receipt. For mobile advertising and marketing initiatives to work more effectively, partnering with a network-agnostic...

Engaging with the value chain

Last week, our regular blog readers (and we hope there are many of those!) will remember that I briefly described the difference between the specialist discipline of mobile advertising versus the supporting – or rather overarching – concept of mobile marketing. As we said, since the entire concept of mobile marketing and mobile advertising is relatively new in Africa, the value chain is still being determined. However, this week we look at key targets that have been determined and how they can assist with rapid market adoption of these new channels and technologies. These are: Advertising agencies, event management firms, brand managers and retailers. InTarget specifically focuses on the four segments above because their buy-in, in particular, when it comes to mobile campaigns is especially crucial when it comes to convincing their own clients of the relevance and importance of mobile marketing and mobile advertising. Only their client’s acceptance of this new medium can truly place big brands into the pockets of consumers. Engagement with the four segments is crucial if firms like InTarget are to move mobile advertising away from its historical narrow focus of mostly being about SMS-based competition entries with a good deal of text tag ads thrown in. Education of individual client service managers will convince more big brands that mobile is in fact an extremely flexible medium that can deliver faster results, more affordably, while also providing scope for significant creative input. This last part is important because television is still largely seen as the Holy Grail for creative types within agencies – every art director wants to win a Loerie for a phenomenal...

Mobile marketing and mobile advertising: two sides of the same coin?

To many of us, mobile marketing and mobile advertising are synonymous. However, the difference is as clear and defined as the difference between a General Practitioner and a specialist medical professional. Let’s take a look at the concept of mobile marketing and how it relates to Mobile advertising and start with a brief quote from the Mobile Marketing Association: “Mobile Advertising in a broad sense can be defined as any paid message communicated by mobile media with the intent to influence the attitudes, intentions and behavior of those addressed by the commercial messages.”. It’s perhaps interesting to note that this definition was coined as far back as 2004! It is even more interesting that the concept still needs to be sold, or at least properly explained, when a formal definition of mobile advertising has existed for at least a decade. In general terms, mobile advertising most often refers to the use of mobile channels as a medium to deliver advertising messages to mobile devices. It is usually divided into two main categories; push and pull advertising. When it comes to push advertising, one must be mindful of the relevant legislation. Push advertising may only be unsolicited when it is delivered by text message to users within the context of an existing customer relationship (e.g Please call me service). It may also be solicited where users agree to have certain services or promotions pushed to them at certain times (e.g. sponsored sports score alerts, Opt in databases etc). Pull advertising, on the other hand, is defined as advertising that is attached to content or services that users request or “pull”...

Mobile ‘have nots’ catching up

It is fairly mind-blowing when one thinks that Sub-Saharan Africa, formerly one of the poorest regions on Earth, has progressed to such an extent that today millions of human beings living here daily access the worldwide web on their mobile phones. As recently as 1994, there were just 4 million phones in the entire region. The lack of development of the region’s fixed line infrastructure meant cellular was just waiting to fill the gap. There has similarly been a lack of attention paid to traditional media in the region. This means that digital improvements are so much more dramatic than in more developed countries where traditional media are better established. The presence of the web now acts as a backdrop of sorts where people can obtain information that is firstly not usually available within traditional, mostly government-run, media. Secondly, digital media platforms provide information that helps people better interpret what they see in traditional media. Unfortunately, the world is unequal and this means that the changes briefly mentioned above have created two kinds of media consumers, although lines are blurring. Mostly rural ‘have-not’ consumers are at a disadvantage to their mostly urban ‘have’ consumer cousins. They do have the same mobile-driven digital media access and have to rely on fewer radio stations, perhaps one mediocre television service and printed media that arrives late or not at all. Even in a more developed Sub-Saharan country like South Africa, only 24% of Internet users live in rural areas. They also enjoy – perhaps ‘cope with’ – painfully slow web connections. However, it’s certainly not all bad news in the bundu as...

Mobile Mythbusting

For all the acres of news coverage on the rising mobile medium, myths still persist around the hottest marketer’s tool since the 1976 advent of television in South Africa. Perhaps the biggest mobile-related myth out there is that mobile still isn’t ubiquitous. Let’s begin mobile myth-busting! Those of us who have spent more than a few years in the corporate ICT world will know that ‘ubiquitous’ is easily one of the most over-used words ever. While that’s certainly true, what’s also true is that in 2015 mobile IS ubiquitous! And this means marketers can be assured of, for all intents and purposes, 100% campaign reach when using the mobile medium. It’s no accident that, for example, one of the most recent retail loyalty programmes to launch – by Spar – uses the customer’s mobile phone to register via a USSD command. It’s quite a thing for a major mass market retailer to imply that virtually every one of its customers must have a cellphone. And Spar is not alone. When combined with web functionality, we find the mobile phone being used to receive One Time Passwords (OTPs) when paying TV licences, transacting with Internet Banking, and more. In fact, according to accepted wisdom in the cellular industry, mobile penetration is now 130%. So we’re no longer talking about a mobile phone in the hands of every consumer, we’re now at a place where there are 1.3 phones in the hands of every consumer. In addition, dual SIM handsets are becoming very popular, especially at the lower end of the market. We need to change some marketers’ mindsets that say...

“Please Call Me” & South Africa’s Mobile Heritage

We are now halfway through South Africa’s annual Heritage Month. According to that online custodian of all earthly knowledge, Wikipedia, Heritage Day is a South African public holiday celebrated every year on 24 September. On this day, and indeed increasingly during the whole month of September, South Africans are encouraged to celebrate their culture and the diversity of their beliefs and traditions. This commitment to marking our joint heritage in general terms had me thinking specifically about South Africa’s unique mobile heritage. Those of us who were there at the start, when the mobile floodgates were thrown open in 1993, would be familiar with South Africa’s cellular journey. It’s been a long and impressive trek indeed, with a whole host of mobile innovations being developed by South Africans for our unique conditions. I remember the first “cocus plumosa” base station disguised as a palm tree being erected in Sandton around the same time prepaid cellular was taking off in 1996. Brolaz Projects, local designers of the palm and other tree varieties, went on to build hundreds of them right across Africa and elsewhere. Vodago, now about 20 years old, was billed as the world’s first successful prepaid cellular system. There are literally hundreds of locally-developed mobile innovations but for the purposes of this mobile advertising platform, let’s zoom in on prepaid. Prepaid cellular should be celebrated as the ‘grand dame’ of mobile marketing because it led to so many mobile advertising platforms that are now available to the marketer. Chief amongst these are the text tags that are appended to the free ‘Please Call Me’ messages that practically every...

The who, what, where & when of mobile marketing

A media milestone of sorts occurred this week when the New York Times passed the one million mark in the number of digital-only subscribers to that venerable 165 year-old institution. As the print editions of many a newspaper continue to fade into obscurity, digital editions take up the slack. And it is not only digital incarnations of formerly print-only advertising vehicles that are finding growing favour with audiences, it is entirely new digital technologies that consumers are turning to in droves. With mobile phone penetration in South Africa alone about to move up to the 140% mark, possibly next year, it’s unfortunate that some marketers refuse to recognise the signs pointing to the demise of print – very recently I mentioned to an acquaintance that a certain story had appeared on the web portal of a well-known South African newspaper, and set about showing him the article on my tablet. All he wanted to know was if he could nip down to the shops, pick up a hardcopy and find the same story in the print edition which has become embarrassingly thin. Make no mistake, print will always have a place in society and that’s especially true with leisure reading, even though today a print edition of a book has a less than 1% chance of being offered for sale in an average bookstore. However, the fact is while we’re (allegedly) better informed, we’re reading less and what we are reading, is more often than not being consumed on a mobile phone screen. Tablets, laptops and desktops combined don’t even equal the amount of content consumers view on their...

There’s a greater chance of buyer’s remorse at your local supermarket

This week I was interested to read about Woolworths removing sweets, chocolates and other sugary treats from the erstwhile-named ‘run of temptation’. Woollies aficionados will know that this refers to the snaking checkout aisle that every shopper has to pass on their way to the tills. It’s not clear whether these items will still be for sale elsewhere in store but what’s clear is that while this is a good move, along with Woolies’ commitment to reducing the salt content of their products, do we really want retailers to make consumption decisions for us? Are consumers so pliable that the mere sight of a slab of Dairy Milk moves them to purchase? And while they’re at it, that full-fat milk needs to go because of the threat of heart attacks and strokes, and let’s not get into the debate on selling wine late into the evening. Woolies’ announcement and the general concept of impulse purchases made me think about the implications for mobile marketing. We’ve often mentioned in this column how the mobile device facilitates easy purchasing decisions for consumers, but does it lead them down the dodgy road of impulse purchasing and buyer’s remorse? I don’t think so. To me, the mobile phone in fact facilitates better purchasing decisions, across all categories of goods and services, because of the web browser that comes standard with practically any decent phone these days. The consumer is even able to access price comparison websites that do all the required homework at the click of a button. Hippo.co.za is a good example. When it comes to products offered by mobile marketers, there’s...

Text messages have the capacity to go viral

A recent viral email that was a little more business-related and that had clear commercial objectives was Volkwagen’s ‘The Fun Theory’ where the brand used a series of experiments to find out if one could make people healthier and more environmentally conscious if mundane activities were made more fun. While piano stairs and the world’s deepest trashcan were examples of things people suggested, it’s not clear if the resultant viral emails directly led to sales. Another type of ‘viral’ marketing communication is, of course, that which is transmitted across mobile devices. Marketers are able to send consumers special offers in the form of SMS vouchers, they can tag them onto ‘Please Call Me’ messages, load them into USSD scripts, and more. And it’s not just vouchers that consumers can engage with, practically any promotional tactic hitherto used in the world of marketing has a mobile equivalent that outperforms the old-style promo device. Clever use of the mobile medium to deliver promotional messages has the potential to develop into the cellular world’s version of ‘word of mouth’ communication. The ease and speed by which mobile communication takes place means literally anyone on a consumer’s contact list can be a recipient of a special offer that’s gone viral. A good mobile campaign can directly translate into feet in stores, or tangible online purchases. The key to driving sales through voucher conversations is to apply a time limit to the special offer that one is transmitting via SMS or OTT channels such as WhatsApp. A time limit has the effect of ensuring that the consumer has a certain amount of time in...

Advertising Media Are Complementary

Oftentimes in our enthusiasm to promote the mobile advertising medium we don’t clearly convey just how complementary traditional and mobile ad mediums can be. Let’s take a brief look at why – if properly integrated by a team of specialists – they can go together like vanilla and chocolate, or perhaps more accurately rum and raisin…

The Humble text message: Perfectly designed for mobile marketing

Mobile technology continues to find great acceptance in South Africa with the country now an impressive number six in the world when it comes to adoption of the mobile web. If one considers there are a whopping 195 countries in the world today, it’s quite an achievement for the world’s 25th biggest economy to be up there in the mobile top 10! Once again, sheer numbers tell us that mobile marketing is where brands need to be. If your organisation hasn’t jumped on the mobile marketing bus, you better get on now – it’ll be standing room only soon. Let’s rewind a little as some readers might be visiting our site for the first time and therefore the concept of ‘mobile marketing’ might need to be clarified. Mobile Marketing involves communicating with the consumer via a cellular handset. The mobile marketer will typically either send a simple marketing message, introduce mobile users to a new audience participation-based campaign or allow them to visit a mobile website. It is important not to equate mobile marketing only with the humble 160-character text message although the SMS is indeed one of the foundation tools of the trade. Experian, a marketing services provider in the US, estimates that the number of worldwide SMS users (approximately 1.8 billion at present) is twice that of active email users. Certainly, that’s 1.8 billion good reasons to embark on a mobile marketing campaign – here’s another good reason: Text messages are generally read within 15 minutes and responded to within the hour. Now compare that to email communication which could go unread for days. In addition, SMS...

Sold On Mobile

Here’s something to think about on this wintery Wednesday: if one considers that 91% of mobile phone owners keep their phone within a one metre radius, 24 hours out of every day, why then do marketers bother with any other type of media? With South African mobile penetration hovering around the 130% mark, it just doesn’t make sense to adopt the ‘spray and pray’ approach that is mass media television advertising, for example, when brand owners can go direct to the source of their future good fortunes: the end mobile phone consumer who probably spends more time looking at that little screen than anything else. Just think about that for a second – the consumer’s spouse, job, and dog, easily get less attention than that SIM card-loaded marketing dream device. When I started out, the often-quoted statistic of 2% was usually trotted out as an example of a good response to a direct mail campaign. Two percent was the holy grail for the direct marketer – if you got 2 out of every hundred people to respond to your offer, you uncorked the sparkling wine and made an excited call to your client on your Motorola StarTac at R2.75 a minute. The irony is that the device you were making the client call on, would in two decades be responsible for unheard of consumer recall and response rates of 13%! Mobile phone users are able to respond to marketers so rapidly, and in such impressive numbers, because of the SIM card that is an integral part of every cellphone. And because about half of all mobile phone users in...

More Data, Video & Apps Are Key Emerging Mobile Ad Trends

A report last year by On Device Research states that South Africa’s mobile penetration rate is now a staggering 133%. ‘Staggering’ is no exaggeration if one remembers that just two decades ago, in 1993, the country had but 4 million landlines, and was just about to roll out its first cellular base station. Twenty years later, we’ve hit the 60 million mobile phone mark. For marketers, the relevance is that along with 60 million South African cellphones comes the fact that advertising rands are better spent when they target mobile screens. Some 63 percent of South Africans, Kenyans and Nigerians say that the mobile Internet has ‘greatly improved’ their lives – no doubt because it has greatly improved their ability to make informed purchasing decisions. Now that it’s clear that the number one mobile marketing trend is ever-increasing opportunities thanks to ever-upwards mobile phone sales, we took a look at what leading opinion-makers say are three more specific mobile advertising trends that we can expect during the latter half of 2015. We looked at VentureBeat, Matomy Media, Target Marketing and CNBC for certain common threads and this is what we came up with: With growing mobile impressions, there’s an increase in demand for better and richer measures of ROI. Advertisers are looking for more meaningful interaction and will therefore want to see more cost-per-acquisition (CPA) campaigns. Essentially, we’re likely to see mobile advertisers focusing increasingly on performance. As users start demanding more interactivity, and marketers realise that video formats are highly effective in engaging users and delivering stronger brand stories, video will become ever more essential. Allied with this...

Voice-based ads

I don’t think it would be out of place to write that ever since our ancestors discovered that logs could be made into seats – and a circle of cavemen could then be called a meeting – we have equated meetings to work. This is why for many years competitive types would settle down at their favourite pubs and hold after-hour meetings where they would all inform each other about how many meetings they had attended that day. This was a way of illustrating to their friends just how hard working they had been. Enter the advent of ubiquitous email access in corporate South Africa, and suddenly hard work is not defined in meeting hours anymore, it’s about how many emails you sent and received during a particular working day. A friend of mine recently told me he sent and received over 120 emails in one day, followed by perhaps a dozen text messages, and in last position, he said he received perhaps ‘one or two’ phone calls. ‘One or two?’ I thought, ‘That’s an opportunity!’ It seems to me that communication has become more text-based than at any other time in history. With people having to work their way through thousands of lines of text-based emails a day, marketers have a fantastic opportunity to be heard – quite literally – via InTarget’s voice-based mobile advertising service. These days, when the phone rings, people take notice because it has become so unexpected for so many of us. And that’s especially true of the younger generation who barely make a phone call today. We’d love to hear from you (forgive...

Mobile means immediate gratification for Intarget clients & mobile users alike

With South Africa’s GDP growth expected to come in well under the 2% percent mark again this year, it’s clear that marketers are under pressure as consumers slash spending and try to conserve as much of their dwindling cash reserves as possible. The good news, however, for InTarget clients is that challenging economic times are when mobile advertising really comes into its own. Few firms can afford to spend right now on lavish brand-building exercises that are designed to deliver little else than promoting vague consumer recall at some far off point in the distant future. What we’re seeing in our business in the current climate is a strong demand for ‘call-to-action’ mobile advertising campaigns that move inventory – and move it quickly, or at least campaigns that result in strong leads. Who can afford to brand the crowning glory of a 50-storey building, for example, or a fleet of 100 cars, and then wait for some unspecified future positive impact on the bottom line? While InTarget can certainly implement mass airtime campaigns, for instance, that are ideal to create general brand awareness, even better and faster results can be achieved by linking mass airtime campaigns to below-the-line promotions. Our interactive mobile platforms and applications can provide the end user with a unique customer experience featuring instant gratification – and immediate sales for the marketer. While we excel at creating billions of monthly advertising impressions through our mobile advertising properties and engagement channels, for the marketer wanting a quick bottom line impact, InTarget offers a variety of sales-supporting tools. For example, sending and receiving bulk text messages is a...

‘Please call me’ Goldmine up for grabs

Often heralded as the biggest homegrown commercial success of the local cellular industry since the November 1996 launch of prepaid cellular, the ‘Please Call me’ service also holds enormous commercial opportunities for advertisers. By enabling prepaid users who have exhausted their airtime to carry on chatting courtesy of another mobile user calling them back, Please Call Me has become a mobile operator multibillion rand goldmine. How many billions? As much as R45 billion according to the Sunday Times in 2013. Good news for the rest of us, however, is that the golden opportunities made possible by Please Call Me can be exploited by practically any brand in South Africa and beyond through InTarget’s text-based ads tagged onto the end of Please Call Me messages. Text Tags are push notification advertising messages that mobile users receive directly on their handsets. Text tags enable brand messages to be succinctly conveyed in 40 to 120 characters. With the attention span of the typical human down to record levels, Please Call Me is a good bet for any brand wanting to get a message across. Interestingly, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the average attention span of a human being has dropped from 12 seconds in 2000 to 8 seconds in 2013. This is one second less than the attention span of a goldfish! Our vision to be a world-leading, well-renowned mobile solutions provider and digital mobile advertising company has seen us design and implement Please Call Me campaigns for such outstanding brands as First Bank, Nigerian Breweries and Metropolitan Insurance Group. All of these corporations benefitted from low costs per...

Integrat positions for growth as Intarget

Leading mobile services aggregator Integrat is now InTarget after completing a rebranding exercise that will see it better-positioned to explore opportunities as a diversified mobile advertising and related solutions provider. As one of South Africa’s most established WASPs (Wireless Application Service Providers) with a 15-year pedigree, Integrat provided mobile aggregation, premium SMS, mobile billing and bulk SMS services across the African continent. It last year launched InTarget after securing mobile advertising tenders from MTN and Airtel which called for the commercialisation of mobile advertising platforms in 32 African countries and Iran. After successfully completing the first ten mobile advertising integrations as InTarget, it became clear to Integrat’s leadership that the future growth of WASPs would be tied to their ability to exploit mobile advertising opportunities in South Africa and beyond. “Collapsing the decade-and-a-half Integrat brand into the new InTarget entity and staying true to a diversification strategy will ensure our continued exponential growth,” said InTarget CMO, Mike Laws. He added that Integrat survived the turbulent times that continue to present challenges for WASPs by pursuing the diversification strategy that this week has seen the Integrat brand retired. Together with the need to diversify revenue streams is the ever-present need for mobile services firms to remain lean while offering clients a streamlined experience. “InTarget is now the proverbial one-stop shop for any organisation wishing to either exploit the opportunities offered by mobile advertising solutions, or reach the customers of mobile operators,” concluded Mr...

Tips for budgeting and timing of mobile advertising campaigns

Your Mobile Advertising campaign needs a set budget and timeframe for it to be successful. These two components often go hand-in-hand because the one can directly influence the other. What should you know to get you started? Keep it small You don’t need over-the-top budgets or extensive timeframes to make your Mobile Advertising campaigns work. Smaller, personalized campaigns that only focus on customers who will actually buy from you, will be more beneficial to your business’s bottom line. Unlike traditional forms of marketing, the “go big or go home” motto doesn’t necessarily apply here. Know what your cost drivers are Get a list together of all the things that you have to budget for during your campaign. Once you know what they are, you can start shopping around. The three most important cost drivers are: Payment for a marketing team/ agency: If you don’t have your own marketing team, you will need people to produce content, implement the strategy, monitor the progress and provide feedback on the results you achieved. The cost of your mobile platform: If you are using text messaging, you need to know how much each SMS will cost you. Or if you are using mobile display advertising, you need to budget for the costs of clicks/ views or the hosting of your ad. The length of your campaign: The length of your campaign directly influences the cost of it. The longer the campaign, the more content you have to produce and the higher the cost of your mobile platform will be. Goals can determine timing A Mobile Advertising campaign always has one or more goals....

How to use customer data in Mobile Advertising

If you want to create an effective Mobile Advertising strategy, you need to know a little something about your customers. But how can you make sure you don’t get lost in all the data and stats and end up failing? Determine the most popular device You have heard this before – your website needs to be mobile friendly and responsive if you want to make a good impression on your customers. But hold on, not every consumer owns the exact same device, and not every device has the same functionality. An advertisement that looks good on a tablet for example, might not look so impressive on a smaller phone. What do you do? Find out what the most popular device is that YOUR consumers are using – not what people around the world prefers. Cater for the unique needs of YOUR customers and they will love you for it. Know how your customers think The customer journey is super important in the world of Mobile Advertising. You need to know things like: how and where people click, which page on your website they like to see first, if they view your Facebook page before making a final purchasing decision etc. Track the journey your customer embarks on from start to finish so you can use this data to create the best experience possible for them. If you can give achieve this, you will receive more follow-throughs on your digital advertisements. And your customers will forget all about those other mobile sites that aren’t up to your standards! Keep your data in context When marketers see that they have a...

What are Text Tag advertisements?

Text Tags are a clever way to incorporate advertisements in permission based mobile messages to your customers. How do these ads look and how does it all work? Have you ever received a Please Call me from someone that look something like this: “Please call John (John’s number). For low insurance premiums, call Company X at number so-and-so.” The first line is the standard wording you expect from a “please call me” message, and the second line is an example of a Text Tag ad. But these mobile ads aren’t limited to call back request alone. You can also insert them in missed call alerts, balance checks, recharge notifications, end of call notifications etc. The only “trick” to this kind of advertising is stricter character limitation. You have less than the usual 160 SMS characters at your disposal because the actual message (e.g please call john) forms part of your overall message. Thus, you are looking at about 40 – 100 characters that you can work with. That is why Text Tag messages usually focus on one strong call-to-action. This action call can say absolute anything you want – e.g. click to call, click to see a menu, click to go to website, click to send SMS etc. Text Tags ads are basically a bonus on top of a message that you have to send anyway. Now, depending on the type of message you are sending to a customer’s handset, the customer will either have the option of saving the message or not. USSD Push type message usually don’t provide you with a storage option that of course has...

Ideas for promoting SMS Marketing in-store

One of the ways you can make your customers aware of your SMS Marketing campaigns, or get them to subscribe to your SMS list, is by promoting it in-store. Here are a few ideas on how you can do it successfully. Posters The first thing you need to do is make marketing material that are bold and in-your-face. You want your customers to see it everywhere they turn in your store. Use bright and beautiful colours and font that is easy to read. Next make sure that the copy contains all the info that a customer requires – it has to contain a strong call to action and instructions on how to sign up for your service. Find strategic locations in your store to place your SMS Marketing posters. Think about the journey your customer has to take from entering to exiting your store. Good examples are: At the entrance to your store. In the aisles. (Suspend it from the ceiling or paste it on the shelves) At the cash register. Till slips People often keep their till slips as proof of payment. Put a short message at the bottom of the slips with instructions on how to subscribe to your SMS Marketing. Make sure that the cashier points out the message to your customers. Wrappers and bags If you can put your logo on wrappers or bags, why not do the same with your promotional messages for mobile? In fact, any object that can be safely printed can serve as a vessel for your message – take a look at the things you use in your store every...

How to use customer data in Mobile Advertising

If you want to create an effective Mobile Advertising strategy, you need to know a little something about your customers. But how can you make sure you don’t get lost in all the data and stats and end up failing? Determine the most popular device You have heard this before – your website needs to be mobile friendly and responsive if you want to make a good impression on your customers. But hold on, not every consumer owns the exact same device, and not every device has the same functionality. An advertisement that looks good on a tablet for example, might not look so impressive on a smaller phone. What do you do? Find out what the most popular device is that YOUR consumers are using – not what people around the world prefers. Cater for the unique needs of YOUR customers and they will love you for it. Know how your customers think The customer journey is super important in the world of Mobile Advertising. You need to know things like: how and where people click, which page on your website they like to see first, if they view your Facebook page before making a final purchasing decision etc. Track the journey your customer embarks on from start to finish so you can use this data to create the best experience possible for them. If you can give achieve this, you will receive more follow-throughs on your digital advertisements. And your customers will forget all about those other mobile sites that aren’t up to your standards! Keep your data in context When marketers see that they have a...
Page 4 of 18« First...23456...10...Last »