Mobile & The Future Of Location-based Games

Mobile & The Future Of Location-based Games

“Pokemon GO gave us a glimpse of the future.” That’s according to the GM for Innovation at leading US mobile firm, Verve. For mobile marketers, the message is that the way Pokemon GO exploded onto the global stage, literally overnight, taught us about mobile users’ willingness to try transacting in the real world based on events in the gaming world. Last year was about coming to grips with the early learnings for marketers inherent in augmented-reality experiences. More knowledge will continue to emerge following the Pokemon GO ‘case study’ of 2016. There is clear consumer interest here and the focus must now be on inventing ways where the industry can leverage what Verve calls “game ad-units”. We need to figure out how virtual gaming experiences that matter to consumers who encounter them in stores and on their screens, can be monetised to the advantage of brands and their agencies. Mobile marketing is ideally-positioned to take advantage of this new phenomenon of the merging of virtual experiences with real-world transactions. This is because we’ve already spent the last few years getting to grips with enabling technologies such as geofencing and the rise of beacons. If we’re talking about the real world, let’s look at a real-world gaming / mobile marketing example. Imagine buying a soft drink when in proximity to a display and a drink brand could prompt the purchasing consumer’s device by rewarding them with a power-up in a game they already play. That’s a tiny taste, or sip, of the potential highly-effective marriage of mobile marketing and gaming. Let’s see how it all unfolds during...
The Importance Of Maximising The Mobile Marketing Moment

The Importance Of Maximising The Mobile Marketing Moment

The topic of today’s blog is maximising the mobile marketing moment. When I originally thought about today’s topic, I wondered about the word ‘moment’. It really does seem that our mobile ‘moments’ are not moments at all, but one never-ending, seamless mobile story. Apparently, in the UK mobile is considered an indispensable part of consumers’ lives because the average person there spends almost three hours per day consuming mobile media. Three hours? That almost doesn’t sound like very many mobile hours for the average South African consumer who perhaps relies much more on their cellphone to make purchasing decisions than their developed world counterparts because of a lack of penetration of ‘traditional’ web connections here. However, no matter what the country, the consumer’s love affair with mobile continues unabated: research suggests four in ten consumers would rather forget their anniversary than lose their mobile phone. Whether it’s checking our news feeds, researching a product or service, or searching for DIY explanatory videos on YouTube, consulting our mobile devices has become second nature, regardless of where we are located. A rapid rise in mobile subscriptions that is expected to reach three-fifths of the world’s population by the end of the decade means there are exciting opportunities for brands to reach consumers at any time and in any location. And they will be able to do this through an almost unlimited number of touch points. The above notwithstanding, perhaps what the South African mobile marketing community needs to focus on here is not so much stretching out that mobile marketing moment but ensuring that it is a better quality, more in-depth...
Mobile Marketers Should Not Be Afraid To Cut To The Chase

Mobile Marketers Should Not Be Afraid To Cut To The Chase

Many of us were raised with the view that one doesn’t talk about money – ever. Unfortunately, this attitude is preventing some mobile marketers from doing what they should be doing. That’s cutting to the chase and asking current and potential customers for their orders. The placement of an actual order for our clients’ goods and services should be the primary goal of every mobile marketing campaign. Now while that seems pretty obvious, sometimes it isn’t because many mobile marketers have a long history in traditional media. This is where huge budgets and a lack of accountability brought on by poor return on investment (ROI) tools mean very often all that’s going on is so-called “brand building”. Translation: ‘brand building’ refers to those over the top TV ads where a voice with an accent you can’t place is reading a never-ending script you can’t stand. Only after the longest 45 seconds does the brand make an appearance, as does the flimsiest of links between the company and whatever cringeworthy life’s lesson was being narrated by the bearded wonder. Perhaps if there was a short code or a QR code displayed beneath the brand identity, all of the above would have been worth it. Mobile marketers are ‘back to basics’ kind of people and we understand that clients really should be moving product when they’re embarking on any kind of marketing campaign. This is why InTarget tells its clients that there is nothing wrong with inserting a bit of hard selling in mobile campaigns. It has to be that way, or else all of the wonderful reporting tools that are...
Mobile Is The Sme’s Best Friend

Mobile Is The Sme’s Best Friend

Most of us still tend to think of mobile marketing as the territory of large corporations. When we read that Coca-Cola is the mobile marketer of the year and hear of top executives like Eric Schmidt saying that mobile marketing is outstripping all of Google’s predictions, you tend to believe that mobile marketing is the preserve of the very biggest. That perception is reinforced because mobile marketing strategies can sound very confusing when brand managers start throwing around acronyms from CPC (cost per click) to USSD (unstructured supplementary data). The perception that mobile is blue chip domain is simply wrong. While InTarget has indeed crafted effective mobile campaigns for some of the African continent’s best-known insurance, banking and automotive brands, we’ve also worked with start-ups who needed a bespoke and humble beachhead into the world of mobile marketing. This brings us to the topic of today’s blog and that’s some good, old-fashioned practical advice for SME’s wanting to try out mobile marketing for the first time. Firstly, it’s always a good idea to come for a chat at a mobile marketing specialist like InTarget, but there are some mobile tactics the start-up on a shoestring budget can try out initially on their own. Possibly the best mobile marketing tactic for the SME is simply capturing cellphone numbers of potential customers. This, of course, has to be done in a responsible way so as not to eventually amount to spamming mobile users. We’ve seen examples of database-building that are as simple as a gym offering local residents the chance to win a free membership by texting a keyword to either...
Retailers Putting Half Their Budgets Into Mobile In 2016

Retailers Putting Half Their Budgets Into Mobile In 2016

A recent report entitled “The Rise of Mobile Marketing Spend in Retail” found that mobile budgets are set to grow the most compared to online and bricks and mortar marketing channels. As is most often the case, the report’s authors are American. However, with the US being a relative latecomer to GSM digital cellular technology, there’s every possibility at least some of the report findings apply to the well-developed South African mobile market. Let’s take a closer look at these findings. Probably the most interesting for local mobile marketers and their retail brand clients is that almost 40 percent of US retailers plan to allocate 50 percent or more of their marketing budget to mobile in 2016. Retailing has always been a cash-focused business with little time for lofty, smoke-and-mirror approaches to marketing strategy. If it doesn’t put money in the till quickly, it’s not going to fly in this sector. The fact that mobile has an immediate positive influence on in-store and online sales through clever time-sensitive devices like discount coupons is surely the top reason brands are putting money into mobile. The widespread and indeed widely-felt global economic slowdown – especially in purchase-driven sectors like retail – means organisations are increasingly keen to implement marketing tactics that can have an immediate effect on the bottom line. Mobile marketing does this in a very slick, measurable and effective...
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